VIDEO: Disney’s “Dream Big, Princess” campaign brings inspiring girl power to the masses

in Disney, Events, Movies, Television

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There’s nothing in the world quite like a Disney Princess.

Whether it be Rapunzel’s go-getter spirit, Mulan’s diehard ambition, or Ariel’s thirst for a better life in a better world, women and children alike have been inspired and moved by countless tales of these classic female protagonists. On top of that, they even have the opportunity to meet these animated role models in Disney Parks all over the globe — and we think that’s just swell.

In a new chapter for the dreamers-and-doers at the Walt Disney Company, it was just revealed that Disney’s new “Dream Big, Princess” campaign looks to enhance or rekindle the fire that’s sparked young girl’s imaginations for so many years. Disney Parks Blog reports that the heart and soul of the campaign lies not in the fictional world, but in the lives of real girls who have overcome adversity and achieved their dreams:

Over the next year, “Dream Big, Princess” will be celebrated with new themes each month tied to the Disney Princesses, such as kindness, friendship and adventure. If you’re staying in one of our resorts or ships, tune your in-room TV to the Company Clips channel to experience the stories of real-life young girls who have dreamed big, including a 16-year-old pilot from Canadian, Texas, and a 14-year-old world champion rock climber from New York City.

“Dream Big, Princess” will also be featured on Disney Channel during its “Night of Big Dreams” on February 19 (7:30–9 p.m. ET), and during Disney Junior’s “Day of Big Dreams,” February 
26 (8 a.m.–2 p.m. ET) on Disney Channel.

Check out the inspiring promotional video below (it moved us to tears):

I don’t know about you, but we at Inside The Magic can’t get enough girl power! Have any inspirational stories of your own? Share them in the comments below.

23 Comments

  1. Tiffany Germann

    Ok….So First of all I’m so excited that Pocahontas is getting more action!! She is my favorite Princess!! I love love love love her!! Seeing her in this spot so much makes me so happy!! The overall spot is wonderful!! I love it!! NOW they just need to do one for the boys as well!! But seriously….well done Disney!!! – I’m 32 and not ashamed to say I teared up :)

  2. Jones

    I´m getting a little bit tired of that girl power thing… and of parents who tell their 3 year olds that it is ok if they want to be a princess once a week, “as long as you do not forget that wishing on a star won´t get you into Harvard, and that mommy and daddy want you to become president one day, and no, foreign secretary won´t do, you don´t want to dissapoint mommy and daddy, do you?”

    1. Jordyn

      I am not sure that you are understanding what the campaign is talking about. It is inspiring girls of all ages that you CAN be a princess in your everyday life. Some parents may not teach the same thing, but this is what we as women, are aiming for in our future generations. Anyone can be a princess in their daily lives.

      1. EricJ

        It’s trying to take back some of the disgruntled BASHING Disney got during our misguided mania for Shrek during those sad, troubled 00’s. (When Dreamworks quickly realized that disgruntled feminists were the only ones laughing at the anti-princess jokes, and piled them on thick in 2 & 3–Which not only sent the series down the toilet, but also traumatized Eisner into thinking he had to dismantle the 2D studio just to “apologize” to an entire generation for Snow White sweeping floors.)
        Feminists keep throwing around their own cynical paranoia that “Little girls watch Cinderella so they can dream about selling themselves into married slavery!”, when in reality, it’s the opposite: To girls, being their specific favorite Disney princess means Being Important, and having some dream ability they don’t get to do in real life, like art, or magic, or archery, or running with animals, or just looking good in a dress.

        Disney knows that, little girls know that, and hate to admit it, but even guys know that, because we don’t have any personal issues and just like the movies. :)
        It’s nice to see Pocahontas remembered as one of girls’ “fantasy self-images”, but oh, do we have to be reminded of the movie-version of Merida, that turned the “empowerment” sentiments a bit nasty?

  3. Susie

    Positive self image is still a problem for girls. Disney has been criticized as one of the creators of the issue in media. I think it is a nice re-branding of sorts. Not sure we should ever get tired of encouraging any of our children to dream and then reach for their dreams while being themselves.

  4. Deanna

    I love it! Children should be encouraged to follow their dreams, if they have dreams then they are more likely to follow them and strive to be more! I want my kids to be all they can be. I have boys and girls and I push hard for dreams, my girls are princesses and son my prince they will be more because I believe in them.

  5. Summer

    I just checked listings for Feb 19 on the Disney Channel and I can’t find this. Anyone else able to locate this program? I want to set it to record.

  6. liz

    First Jones I think you miss the whole purpose, I think it’s exactly the opposite as what you think. It IS about knowing you have the power and ability to make it to Harvard or whatever else you want. Not sit o. Your laurels waiting for your prince to come swish you away. You have the smarts and power to do it yourself. That’s the whole message. If you reread the info. Maybe you can see this now…
    If you work at the park you will see more corporate females and women in authority in the company as well so they are putting it into practice too.
    Now I am sooooo pleased to see pocahantas get some more center time! She is so much overlooked and lately we have seen a but more of her which I think is by demand of the fans…

    1. EricJ

      First of all, reality check for feminist Disney bashers: Snow White did not “sit around wishing” for A prince to come, she’s wishing for HER prince to come–She already has one, they met in the first scene, and she’s wondering if he knows where she is, now that she’s on the run.
      (Which is sort of an example of the sort of skewed guff Disney has to fight in keeping a positive princess example for girls. The cynical grownups keep getting it wrong.)

      Back when “Enchanted” was changed midstream from an Eisner-era princess-bashing comedy to a new Lasseter-era pro-princess comedy, Disney had to retool the comedy for why we liked princesses. They ended up satirizing the whole “Keep your daughter isolated from fantasy” mentality of Millennial parents, with the running joke of the dad trying to get his daughter hooked on empowered biographies of Marie Curie–“She’s the dead one, right?”–but once a real princess shows up… :)

  7. Marie

    As a mommy that grew up just when Title IX was created and things were much harder, I love when girls are empowered and I love that Disney takes this head on….girls CAN most DEFINITELY be who they dream to be — and it is our collective job to love them and support their efforts.
    With this in mind, however, I must add, that I wish Disney would do the same for boys. As the mommy of two young boys, I have been consciously raising them to be the kind, loving, respectful young gentlemen that they were born to be. It takes huge active involvement as a parent to do this as the world still often tells young boys that they must love superheroes and think “girl stuff” is yucky. It is challenging to find positive, bright male role models in mainstream media. Moreover, adults — including teachers — go so far out of their way to nurture girls that boys are often left behind and to their own grooming even when they are gifted. PLEASE, PLEASE Disney…..develop a complimentary campaign to nurture young boys so that they too can dream to be a scientist, an athlete, a contractor, a business man, an artist, a dancer, an architect, an actor, a musician, a teacher…..a dreamer…..all while being a gentleman. The world needs more strong, respectful, dignified princes to make the world a better place along side those princesses — and it is our collective job to love them and support their efforts as well.

  8. Angela

    I get it ! Thats great for girl power, I just had my 4yr old boy tell us boys don’t have dreams ! If your trying to send a message please do both genders or etc. at the same time theses kids really are not able to comprehend what your trying to do for girls !

  9. I like dream big princess it so beautiful and brave

  10. I AM 11 YERS I LOVE LOVE THIM SO MUCH AND I LEVE IN SANIVILL IN PINANG BLOK E FLOR 10 ADERAS 7

  11. clayren

    I really wish I could be Cinderella, living in a castle with a prince in a happy life..well, i really wanna spent my day inside the castle wearing a cinderella’s dress .hope my dream comes true..

  12. elfie

    Disney really hit the mark with this promo spot. Inspiring girls to pursue their dreams & talents, it sends a powerful message.

    The editing is next to none, flowing seamlessly between clips which capture the rythmn of the music while highlighting the lyrics. Beautifully done!

  13. elfie

    And, to add, it moved me tears as well.

  14. Lindsay

    I am all about empowering girls. This is a great campaign. But what I am supposed to tell my SONS? Sorry, only girls and princesses can do anything? They take things literally, so they don’t understand when I tell them boys can be this way too. I am personally tired of all the girl campaigns and making boys look like they aren’t important anymore. Let’s do some of these dream big stuff with boys. I mean, there aren’t even princes in Disney anyway that are main characters.

  15. Holli

    I’m all for telling kids to “dream big,” but let’s make it an even playing field for both boys AND girls.

  16. Roger

    Great video. Does anyone know who did the voice over???? Sounds so familiar and can’t figure it out.

  17. Captian Obvious

    Disney has become completely anti-boy with their shows, movies, and ads.
    This social justice garbage has to stop.
    Girls are “strong and independent” yet we have to coddle them and constantly pat them on the back for simply existing!?

    Even when Disney took over starwars they had to fill the social justice quotas where the lead had to be a “strong female” hero who was just magically great at everything with a minority secondary character and all villains are white males.
    Even their stupid commercials only have a little girl as the main point of the commercial as if boys somehow stopped being interested in starwars (which will be the case if they keep running it into the social justice shit any longer).

    Their Show line up is all female centered shows: Jessie, KC undercover, Liv and Maddie, etc.
    They have tv movies like Zapped and “how to make a better boy” which are both just blatantly sexist… and yet people blindly accept it because it’s ok to hate on boys for simply being born.

    It’s funny how the claim of “equality” is always stated but the actions always seem to be removing males from everything as if it were somehow making up for past bullshit.
    You can NOT achieve equality by removing the other side from existence.

Trackbacks

  1. Be Your Own Champion – Enhancing Your Globe
  2. Why Does Disney Hate Boys So Much? Their Male Characters Are Losers
  3. Why Does Disney Hate Boys So Much? All Their Male Characters Are Losers – LibertyREDUX

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